Home Day In Music History This Day In Rock History: Jan 29th

This Day In Rock History: Jan 29th

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  • 1961, Bob Dylan achieved his dream of meeting his idol Woody Guthrie when Guthrie was on weekend release from hospital where he was being treated for Huntington’s Chorea. Dylan told him; ‘I was a Woody Guthrie jukebox’. Guthrie gave Dylan a card which said: ‘I ain’t dead yet’.
  • 1964, The Beatles spent the day at Pathe Marconi Studios in Paris, France, The Beatles’ only studio recording session for EMI held outside the UK. They recorded new vocals for ‘She Loves You’, ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand’ and ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’, after EMI’s West German branch persuaded Brian Epstein that they would be unable to sell large quantities of records in Germany unless they were recorded in the German language. A translator coached John, Paul, and George, although their familiarity with the German language from their Hamburg days made things much easier.
  • 1964, The Beatles spent the day at Pathe Marconi Studios in Paris, France, The Beatles’ only studio recording session for EMI held outside the UK. They recorded new vocals for ‘She Loves You’, ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand’ and ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’, after EMI’s West German branch persuaded Brian Epstein that they would be unable to sell large quantities of records in Germany unless they were recorded in the German language. A translator coached John, Paul, and George, although their familiarity with the German language from their Hamburg days made things much easier.
  • 1967, Jimi Hendrix and The Who appeared at The Saville Theatre, London, England. 20 year-old future Queen guitarist Brian May was in the audience.
  • 1969, Fleetwood Mac had their only UK No.1 single with the instrumental ‘Albatross’ which was composed by guitarist Peter Green. ‘Albatross’ is the only Fleetwood Mac composition with the distinction of having inspired a Beatles song, ‘Sun King’ from 1969’s Abbey Road.
  • 1979, 16-year-old Brenda Spencer killed two people and wounded nine others when she fired from her house across the street onto the entrance of San Diego’s Grover Cleveland Elementary School. Spencer fired the shot’s from a .22-caliber rifle her father had given her for Christmas. When asked why she did it, she answered ‘I don’t like Mondays.’ The Boomtown Rats went on to write and recorded a song based on the event.
  • 1983, Australian group Men At Work went to No.1 on the British and American singles and album charts simultaneously with ‘Down Under’ and ‘Business As Usual’. The last artist to achieve this was Rod Stewart in 1971.
  • 1989, Marc Almond started a four-week run at No.1 on the UK singles chart with ‘Something’s Gotten Hold Of My Heart’ with guest vocals from Gene Pitney, (who also had a hit with the song in 1967).
  • 1992, American blues singer and guitarist Willie Dixon died of heart failure. He wrote the classic songs ‘You Shook Me’, ‘I Can’t Quit You Baby’, ‘Hoochie Coochie Man’, ‘I Just Want to Make Love to You’ and ‘Little Red Rooster’. Dixon was a major influence on The Rolling Stones, Cream, The Yardbirds and Led Zeppelin.
  • 1996, George Michael had the UK No.1 single with ‘Jesus To A Child’, the singers sixth UK No.1 as a solo artist and the first single from his come-back album ‘Older’, (after lengthy litigation with his record company).
  • 2006, Arctic Monkeys went to No.1 on the UK album chart with their debut album ‘Whatever People Say I Am That’s What I’m Not’. The Sheffield-based bands album became the fastest-selling debut in chart history after shifting more than 360,000 copies in its first week of release. The album’s title was taken from a line from the novel Saturday Night and Sunday Morning written by Alan Sillitoe.
  • 2009, Singer-songwriter John Martyn died in hospital in Ireland at the age of 60. The folk, blues and funk artist was widely regarded as one of the most soulful and innovative singer-songwriters of his generation and had been cited as an influence by artists as varied as U2, Portishead and Eric Clapton.
  • 2009, Former American Idol winner Kelly Clarkson made the largest ever leap to number one in US chart history, rising 96 places. Her single, My Life Would Suck Without You, rose from 97 to the top of the Billboard chart after selling 280,000 downloads in its first week of release. A clip from the video for the single was premiered in the commercial break of that week’s episode of American Idol.
  • 2010, Sly Stone filed a $50m (£30.9m) legal claim against his former manager, alleging fraud and 20 years of stolen royalties. The 66-year-old funk musician of the 1970s group Sly and the Family Stone, claimed in the Los Angeles Superior Court that Jerry Goldstein diverted millions in royalties to fund a lavish lifestyle.
  • 2013, The Official UK Album Chart saw its lowest sales in nearly 17 years as Ed Sheeran returned to the top spot. The singer’s debut record, +, went back to No.1 for the first time since September with sales of just 20,607. This was the lowest total since September 1995 when the Levellers’ Zeitgeist was top with 13,885 sales.

Born on this day:

  • 1938, Born on this day, James Jamerson bassist played with The Funk Brothers on many Motown hits by The Temptations, Marvin Gaye, The Four Tops, Martha And The Vandellas and others. Jamerson died of a heart attack on 2nd August 1983 aged 45.
  • 1943, Born on this day, Tony Blackburn, DJ on Radio Caroline and the first D.J. on BBC Radio 1 (The first song played was ‘Flowers In The Rain by The Move’). Blackburn was crowned ‘King of the jungle’ in 2003 after winning on the UK TV show ‘I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here’ set in the Australian outback.
  • 1944, Born on this day, Andrew Loog Oldham, producer, manager and the first Rolling Stones manager. Oldham launched the Immediate label in 1965 which enjoyed 24 UK Top 50 hits. Also worked with Small Faces, John Mayall, Rod Stewart, The Nice, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton and the Amen Corner.
  • 1947, Born on this day, David Byron, singer, with Uriah Heep who had the 1975 UK No.7 album ‘Return To Fantasy’. Byron died on 28th February 1985.
  • 1952, Born on this day, Thomas Erdelyi, (Tommy Ramone), Hungarian drummer with the Ramones who had the 1977 UK No.22 single ‘Sheena Is A Punk Rocker’. Erdelyi also worked as a record producer and was an assistant engineer for the production of the Jimi Hendrix album Band of Gypsys. He died on July 11, 2014 following unsuccessful treatment for bile duct cancer.
  • 1953, Born on this day, Louie Perez, American songwriter, percussionist and guitarist with Los Lobos who had the 1987 UK & US No.1 single ‘La Bamba’.
  • 1961, Born on this day, Dave Baynton-Power, drummer withs James who had the 1991 UK No.2 single ‘Sit Down’. Also worked with The Alarm.
  • 1961, Born on this day, Eddie Jackson bassist with American progressive heavy metal band Queensryche. Their 1994 album ‘Promised Land’ went top 3 in the US,
  • 1962, Born on this day, Marcus Verne from British group Living In A Box, who had the 1987 UK No.5 single ‘Living In A Box’.
  • 1964, Born on this day, Roddy Frame, guitarist, singer, songwriter with British group Aztec Camera, who had the 1988 UK No.3 single ‘Somewhere In My Heart’.

Photo: Getty

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