This Day In Rock History: Nov 28th

no 28 sq

  • 1960, Elvis Presley  started a six week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with ‘Are You Lonesome Tonight’, his third US No.1 of 1960. The single included a spoken passage loosely based on Shakespeare.
  • 1964, The Shangri-Las went to No.1 on the US singles chart with the ‘teen death song’, ‘Leader Of The Pack’. When released in the UK the song was refused airplay by the BBC, (probably due to its death theme), where it went on to chart three times: No.11 in 1965; No.3 in 1972 (by which time the BBC ban had been lifted); and once again at No.7 in 1976.
  • 1968, On their first North American tour, Deep Purple played the first of four nights at the Fillmore West in San Francisco, California.
  • 1970, Dave Edmunds was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with his version of the 1955 Smiley Lewis hit ‘I Hear You Knocking.’ Also the first release on the new MAM record label.
  • 1976, The Sex Pistols appeared on BBC TV’s ‘Nationwide’ and ITV’s ‘London Weekend Show.’
  • 1976, The Tom Robinson Band made their live debut at The Hope & Anchor, London. The bands biggest hit ‘2-4-6-8 Motorway’ peaked at No.5 in the UK in Oct 77. Robinson now also works as a radio presenter.
  • 1987, REM had their first entry in the Top 10 on the US singles chart with ‘The One I Love.’
  • 1991, Nirvana recorded a performance for BBC TV music show Top Of The Pops in London. When asked to lip-sync ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’  to a pre-recorded tape Kurt Cobain protested by singing an octave lower (he later confirmed he was imitating Morrissey from The Smiths), and attempted to eat his microphone at one point. He also changed some of the lyrics, exchanging the opening line “load up on guns, bring your friends,” for “load up on drugs, kill your friends.”
  • 1999, Rage Against The Machine were at No.1 on the US album chart with ‘The Battle Of Los Angeles’ the bands second US No.1.
  • 2000, David Bowie was crowned the musician’s musician. Bowie beat The Beatles and alternative rockers Radiohead in a survey by the NME that asked hundreds of top rock and pop stars to name their biggest musical influence.
  • 2002, Tony McCarroll the original drummer with Oasis failed in a bid to sue the group’s lawyers after he was sacked because he took too long to file his claim. Judge Justice Gray, at the High Court in London, told McCarroll his case could not proceed because he had brought his claim outside of the six-year time limit.
  • 2004, Metallica played the last show on their 137-date ‘Madly in Anger with the World Tour’ at the HP Pavilion in San Jose, California. It became the fourth-highest grossing tour of 2004, reaping $60,500,000 in ticket sales.

Born on this day:

  • 1929, Born on this day, Berry Gordy, founder of Motown Records, former boxer, composer, (wrote Jackie Wilson’s ‘Reet Petit’).
  • 1943, Born on this day, Randy Newman, singer, songwriter, Composer of ‘Mama Told Me Not To Come’, ‘Simon Smith And The Amazing Dancing Bear’, 1977 US No.2 single ‘Short People.’ Film soundtracks including ‘Ragtime.’ Once hailed as the greatest songwriter alive by Paul McCartney.
  • 1949, Born on this day, Hugh McKenna, keyboards, Sensational Alex Harvey Band, (1975 UK No.7 single ‘Delilah, 1975 album ‘Next’).
  • 1962, Born on this day, Matt Cameron, drummer with Soundgarden, who joined Pearl Jam in 1998. At the age of thirteen, he and some friends played in a cover band called KISS, however, after a letter from the management of the rather better-known band Kiss, threatening the boys with legal action, they called it a day.
  • 1970, Born on this day, Matt Cheslin, bass player, Neds Atomic Dustbin, (1991 UK No.16 single ‘Happy’).
  • 1983, Born on this day, American songwriter, composer, producer and multi-instrumentalist, Rostam Batmanglij from Vampire Weekend. 2010 US & UK No.1 album, ‘Contra’ and the 2013 US No.1 album ‘Modern Vampires of the City’.

Photos: Getty

Related News