Mark Gatiss Responds To ‘Sherlock’ Criticism With Poem

markgatiss3‘Sherlock’ writer Mark Gatiss has responded to criticism of the most recent episode of the show with a humorous poem. ‘Sherlock’ began airing its fourth season on New Years Day and has so far been met with mixed reviews.

Sherlock’s most recent episode ‘The Six Thatchers’ was one of the most action packed 90 minutes of television that the BBC has aired in years. Containing numerous fistfights, torture scenes and the occasional machine gun toting assassin abseiling down from the ceiling, ‘The Six Thatchers’ made a huge success of getting the show’s legions of die hard fans thoroughly excited for the rest of the season.

Despite obtaining plenty of praise from the viewing public, the episode was not quite as warmly received by a select few media critics, who felt the episode’s brash James Bond style storytelling had caused the show to veer too far from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s original novels. The Guardian critic Ralph Jones gave the episode a particularly rough review in his most recent column entry.

Clearly taking issue with the review, Mark Gatiss (who also stars in the show as Sherlock’s brother Mycroft) responded with a witty poem, which both addresses the episode’s criticism and demonstrates the writers unparalleled knowledge of Conan Doyle’s work.

Here is the poem in full:

Here is a critic who says with low blow
Sherlock’s no brain-box but become double-O.
Says the Baker St boy is no man of action –
whilst ignoring the stories that could have put him in traction.

The Solitary Cyclist sees boxing on show,
The Gloria Scott and The Sign of the Fo’
The Empty House too sees a mention, in time, of Mathews,
who knocked out poor Sherlock’s canine.

As for arts martial, there’s surely a clue
in the misspelled wrestle Doyle called baritsu.
In hurling Moriarty over the torrent
did Sherlock find violence strange and abhorrent?

In shooting down pygmies and Hounds from hell
Did Sherlock on Victorian niceties dwell?
When Gruner’s men got him was Holmes quite compliant
Or did he give good account for The Illustrious Client?

There’s no need to invoke in yarns that still thrill,
Her Majesty’s Secret Servant with licence to kill
From Rathbone through Brett to Cumberbatch dandy
With his fists Mr Holmes has always been handy.

Photo: Getty

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